Gil Scott-Heron is back‏

Gil Scott-Heron, without doubt one of the most important voices in 20th
century music is back. It is his first new material in 13 years and sees
him sounding as vital and forward thinking as ever. Check out the new
single “Me and the Devil”, taken from the forthcoming album “I’m New Here”
(Out February 8th (UK) / February 9th (USA)).

Available via digital download, ‘Me And The Devil’ is also accompanied by a
stunning video by Coodie & Chike with Michael Sterling Eaton, the team
behind numerous Kanye West and Mos Def videos. See the video at

http://bit.ly/meandthedevil


You can pre-order the album from:

UK — http://tinyurl.com/GilScottHeronUK

USA — http://tinyurl.com/GilScottHeronUSA

For information, and to keep up to date with the latest Gil Scott-Heron
news please visit:

http://www.gilscottheron.net
http://www.myspace.com/gilscottheron

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The Day The Music Was Resurrected

For four years in a row Simon Cowell’s X-Factor has dominated the Christmas number one slot in the charts. He’s certainly not the first person to send bland, manufactured porridge masquerading as music to the top of the charts but he is the first to insist year on year that there is no alternative.

Year after year he unleashes all the corporate power at his disposal, including a prime-time TV show which acts as a long-running, dedicated advertising campaign that puts QVC and the Shopping Channel to shame, all in the service of his ever-burgeoning fortunes.

Stacked against him were a married couple in Essex, Jon and Tracy Morter, who decided that enough was enough and launched a campaign from their living room to depose the dictator.

How were they going to do it? By backing Killing In The Name by rap-rock band Rage Against the Machine (RATM).

Leaping beyond all their expectations the campaign, based mainly through the internet as the song was no longer available in the shops, became a mini-movement with almost a million people joining the Facebook group and over half-a-million people buying the single in a week.

Joyously it topped the charts with no corporate backing nor even, initially, with the knowledge of the band itself. Continue reading

EXCLUSIVE unedited Rage Against the Machine on BBC December 17th 2009

Rage Against the Machine on BBC Thursday Dec. 17th 2009

For more info click here http://www.rockpit.com/ratm…

See the BBC censored broadcast here http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/8418158.stm

Go buy the single at http://bit.ly/rage-amazon you know it makes sense! #RATM

For more on Rage Against The Machine go to http://www.ratm.com/

Rage Against the Machine has made another rare return from its 2000 breakup to wake up a nation it believes has been desensitized by being spoon-fed a culture of reality television and “one schmaltzy ballad after another,” according to guitarist Tom Morello

The Legendary Godfather of Rap Returns – Gil Scott-Heron Interview

In early 2010 Gil Scott-Heron will release a brand new album entitled ‘I’m New Here’ on XL Recordings. For more info and to download the track ‘Where Did The Night Go’ for free go to http://imnewhere.net/

Originally broadcast on BBC2 on Monday 16th November 2009

Gil Scott-Heron – ‘I’m New Here’ out early 2010.

gscottheron1

In early 2010 Gil Scott-Heron will release a brand new album entitled ‘I’m New Here’ on XL Recordings.

Here are four excerpts from his first album of new material since 1997; ‘A.M.’, ‘I’m New Here’, ‘Me And The Devil’ and ‘I’ll Take Care Of You’. These tracks have been recorded in New York over the past 18 months.

Live review: Gil Scott-Heron at the El Rey and new album

October 5, 2009 |  3:25 pm

“For those of you who believed I wouldn’t be here,” Gil Scott-Heron told the El Rey crowd with an amiable smile Sunday night, “you lose.”  It was the 60-year-old poet, musician, spoken-word sage and hip-hop harbinger’s first show in L.A. in several years. After decades of parsing media mirages in song, it was as if Scott-Heron’s mere appearance onstage were his latest political provocation. He said nothing about the drug- and health-related predicaments that had kept him from performing in the U.S., except to suggest that the rumors on the Internet had been, to borrow the words of another humorous and acutely race-conscious American raconteur, Mark Twain, greatly exaggerated.  The message was simply this: Gil Scott-Heron is still here.

Seated behind a keyboard, Scott-Heron introduced himself to the audience with a freewheeling and amusing monologue that took in the ludicrousness of CNN-commissioned “experts,” the trick of finding your own “-ology” and the problems with February as Black History Month and calendars in general. He announced a new record (his first in more than a decade and a half) to be released next year, “I’m New Here,” which he joked would surprise listeners as much as “the old ones you have not bought,” and a book, “The Last Holiday,” chronicling Scott-Heron and Stevie Wonder’s 1980s campaign to make the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday a national holiday.

Scott-Heron began the set by himself, with his song dedicated to voting rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer in honor of her Oct. 6 birthday, “95 South (All of the Places We’ve Been).” He was then joined by his band,  including saxophonist Leon Williams, guitarist Ed Brady, bassist Robert Gordon, keyboardist and vocalist Kim Jordan and drummer Kenny Powell. They launched into another song, “We Almost Lost Detroit” (also from the 1977 album “Bridges”), after Scott-Heron’s shout-out to a “brother named Common” who sampled the song for 2007’s “The People.”

It was a meditative and exuberant night. The set continued with the rousing rebuke to “the military and the monetary” in “Work for Peace,” the vivacious musicological query “Is That Jazz?,” his stirring national elegy “Winter in America” and “Your Daddy Loves You,” which Scott-Heron dedicated to his own daughter in the audience.  The singer who boldly derided Ronald Reagan in “B Movie” and “Re-Ron” refrained from mentioning any specific political figures. This was not an evening for discussion of how “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” or an open letter to rappers in a “Message to the Messengers.” Continue reading

Tensions Rise in Latin America over US Military Plan to Use Three Bases in Colombia

The Colombian government has agreed to grant US forces the use of three Colombian military bases for South American anti-drug operations. The move has heightened tensions between Colombia, the largest recipient of US military aid in the Americas, and its neighbors, particularly Venezuela and Ecuador. Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez warned that the US Army could invade his country from Colombia.

Clip courtesy of Democracy Now